+ What are your shelter hours?

Shelter visitation is by appointment only. Please contact us to set up an appointment if you would like to visit. We have a caretaker that lives onsite and may be taking an animal to the veterinarian, so we need to coordinate your visit for a time when someone will be there.

+ What are your thrift shop hours, and where are you located?

Second Chances Thrift Shop is open Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10am – 5:30pm. We are located on Rte. 123 at 2425 New Easley Hwy, Greenville, SC 29611. We are located next door to Greenville Aluminum Products.

+ Where can I drop off donations?

Donations can be dropped off at Second Chances Thrift Shop during open hours (Thursday, Friday or Saturday from 10am-5:30pm). Donations can also be dropped off at our shelter in Simpsonville by appointment only. If you have large items to donate that you need help moving, please contact us as we have volunteers with trucks that may be willing to assist with moving these items.

+ I am interested in adopting a dog or cat. What are your adoption fees?

All our dogs and cats are neutered or spayed, up-to-date on shots, dewormed, microchipped and on a monthly heartworm/flea and tick preventative. Personal and veterinary references are required as part of the adoption process, along with a home visit to help ease the transition of the new pet into its new family. If for any reason the adoption is not successful, the animal must be returned to CCA. Effective January 1, 2018, adoption fees are as follows:

  • Kittens and cats up to four years old: $100
  • Cats over the age of four: $75
  • Puppies and dogs up to four years old: $150
  • Dogs over the age of four: $100
  • Barn cats: please inquire

+ What veterinarians participate in your low cost spay/neuter program?

We do not publish a list of participating veterinarians because it changes periodically, and some vets only do dogs or cats or a predetermined number of animals per month. We will try to send your pet to the vet located closest to you if your vet does not participate in CCA’s spay/neuter program.

+ I have a pet that I need to surrender. Do you have any space at your shelter?

We do not accept owner surrenders at our shelter. Most of the time our shelter is at capacity and any open spots would be reserved for homeless or stray animals. We do recommend the following if you need to re-home your pet:

  • Rehoming websites: List your pet on the “Get Your Pet” website (getyourpet.com). Dogs can also be listed on the “How I Met My Dog” website.
  • Rescue groups: Research breed and age specific rescues to see if they may be willing to take your pet or place a courtesy post on their Facebook page. Our “Resource Listing” contains some rescues in the area that may be willing to help.
  • Courtesy Facebook Post: We can do a courtesy post on our CCA Facebook page. Please email us at concernedcitizens4animals@gmail.com with pictures of your animal, a brief description and your contact information for interested adopters to message you directly.
  • Shelter: If you must place your pet in a shelter, first try no-kill shelters such as the humane society (which are shelters that have a 90% or higher save rate). Some county shelters are no-kill but many times they are operating over capacity.

Please note: We do not recommend placing your pet on Craigslist for free. Please be vigilant before placing your pet with a stranger and consider checking vet references and doing a home visit. Charging a nominal fee can help weed out prospective adopters who may not have the best interest of your animal at heart.

+ I have found a dog, cat or other type of pet. What should I do?

If you have found a pet, please take the following steps:

  • Knock: on nearby house doors to see if anyone knows the animal’s owner.
  • Microchip Scan: if the animal is in your possession, bring it to a nearby shelter or veterinarian’s office. They will do a free scan to see if the animal has a microchip. If so, they will help track down the owners.
  • PawBoost: take a picture of the animal and do a free post on www.pawboost.com.
  • Facebook: place a picture of the animal along with a description of where it was found on one of the many Lost and Found Facebook pages. Some examples are: Lost & Found Pets of South Carolina and Lost and Found Pets Upstate S.C.
  • Next Door: use the Next Door app to inform your neighbors.
  • Flyers: make flyers with a picture of the animal. Distribute at the county shelter, veterinarians’ offices and hang near where the animal was found.
  • Shelter Veterinarian: if the animal is injured, please call animal control or bring it to a shelter. Many shelters have veterinarians onsite that may be able to help with medical treatment. Our Resource List also identifies some medical care resources that may be able to help provide financial assistance for injured animals.
  • Other Contacts: if you’re unable to keep the animal, please contact the humane society, your local county shelter or a rescue group. Please reference our Resource List for local shelters and rescue groups.

Please note: Before returning an animal, please request proof from anyone claiming to be the owner (e.g. pictures or other ways to identify the animal: color of collar, male/female, markings, etc.). SC has a 5-day stray hold before an animal can be legally adopted out to another party.

+ I have lost a dog, cat or other type of pet. What should I do?

If you have lost your pet, please take the following steps:

  • Visit: the county shelter and ask to do a walk through to see if your pet has been brought in.
  • Flyers: make flyers with a picture of your pet. Distribute at the county shelter, veterinarians’ offices and hang near where the animal was last seen.
  • PawBoost: take a picture of your pet and do a free post on www.pawboost.com.
  • Facebook: place a picture of your pet along with a description of where it was lost on one of the many Lost and Found Facebook pages. Some examples are: Lost & Found Pets of South Carolina and Lost and Found Pets Upstate S.C.
  • Next Door: use the Next Door app to inform your neighbors.
  • Black River Search and Rescue: contact this SC based group and request their checklist for steps to take when you lose a dog.

+ Can you help with the stray cats I have been feeding?

We have a trap-neuter-return (TNR) program and may be able to assist you in trapping the cats, getting them spayed or neutered and returning them back to their feral cat colony. There must be someone willing to feed them on an ongoing basis. If the cat has been spayed or neutered, it’s ear will be tipped. If you are interested in this program, please contact us and you will be placed on a waitlist.

+ I found babies or an injured bunny, deer, bird or other wildlife animal. What should I do?

Babies often have a parent nearby. If the animal does not appear injured or in immediate danger, please leave it alone. If the animal does appear injured or sick, please put on gloves and gently place the animal in a towel padded box. Put this box in a dark, quiet location away from others. Do not feed the animal. For animals that are young, place a heating pad on a low setting underneath half of the box to keep it warm. It’s important the animal has a place to get away from the heat if it becomes too warm. Please contact an expert for further instruction. Our Resource List contains wildlife rehabbers, sanctuaries and rabbit rescues that will be able to provide you with information on how to proceed.

+ My pet is sick or injured and I can’t afford medical treatment. Can you please help with the cost?

Unfortunately, we do not have a medical fund. You can ask your veterinarian if they would be willing to put you on a payment plan. Some places offer a sliding payment scale. Our Resource List also has some medical care resources that may be able to help provide financial assistance.

+ I am concerned about a dog that does not have adequate food, water, shelter or is tethered. Can you help?

Unfortunately, we do not have the authority to go on personal property to investigate. Please contact animal control and provide them with any documentation you have (photos, videos, etc.). You may ask to remain anonymous. Contact information for local county animal control units can be found on our Resource List. If you have concerns about the animal being cold, you may also want to offer any extra hay you have to be used as bedding. If you have concerns about the dog being tethered, you may also want to reference our Resource List for organizations that help get animals off chains and may be willing to build fencing.

+ I witnessed someone being abusive to an animal. What should I do? Should I post it on Facebook?

Obtain as much documentation as you can (photos, videos, license plate numbers, etc.). It is best to provide this information to animal control first, so they can properly investigate. You can ask to remain anonymous. If you post it on social media, it can be detrimental to their investigation because the potential offender could find out and develop an alibi or destroy evidence. Witnesses may also be less likely to cooperate out of fear or they may get paid off to remain silent. Our Resource List contains contact information for local county animal control units.

+ I think there may be a dog fighting ring. Can you help?

Contact animal control and provide them with any documentation you have so that they can properly investigate. Contact information for local county animal control units can be found on our Resource List. The Humane Society of the United States also has a hotline setup for dog fighting tips. They may provide reward money if it leads to a conviction. Their number is 1-877-TIP-HSUS. You can ask to remain anonymous with local animal control and the Humane Society.